What I thought of Savior #1

savior

Around 25 years ago I worked for a comics distribution company in the UK called Neptune Distribution, and we had a publishing arm called Trident Comics. By far our most successful comic was Mark Millar’s very first printed work, Saviour.

saviour1-markmillar

 

Saviour’s plot was that the Antichrist was real, pretending to be Jesus Christ born again and just happened to be the planet’s only superhero as after all, Christ has super powers really, so Mark just played with that idea over Saviour’s all too short run.

So here I am having a shufty through this weeks comics and I see a comic written by Todd McFarlane with Brian Holguin called Savior with this synopsis attached to it.

What if the MOST DANGEROUS man on Earth was also the one trying to do the MOST GOOD?

The world is real. The people are normal. And then he appears! A man appears with no background, no memory, and no place to call home. But he has powers. Powers that seem resemble those we learned about in Sunday School. Could it be?! Is it possible that this man is much, much more than that? Is it possible that he is our “SAVIOR” in the flesh? And if he is, then why doesn’t he know who he is or how he got his powers?

Strip away the spandex and trappings of the traditional comic superhero and ask yourself a simple question: “How would I react if GOD suddenly appeared in front of me, but everything we had been taught about him seems out of whack?” What you would have left, beyond your own doubts, is the presence of a man who has to deal with the fact that his appearance in the world is seen as both a blessing and a curse.

Some will see him as a hero, a messiah. Other will see him as an enemy because there isn’t room for a person with god-like powers to disrupt the status quo of what we already believe. Some will rally behind him. Others will denounce him. But none of us will be able to ignore him.

It isn’t quite Mark’s tale, but it’s the same basic idea, so I threw caution to the wind and bought it off Comixology to give it a go. As a comic, it’s pretty dreadful. Yes, the art by Clayton Crain is fine but there’s pages of Claremontesque speech balloons that simply are just endless amounts of poorly written exposition that thinks it’s trying to be Warren Ellis but isn’t.

savior1

It also suffers from the cardinal sin of too many modern mainstream comics in that it’s got one eye on a film/TV adaptation as it flows from opening exposition into the first big action scene and really, by this point I don’t really care. None of the characters we’ve been introduced to are anything but flat one-dimensional people, and the interesting idea quickly hits beats that anyone that’s seen the Nic Cage film Knowing will be familiar with.

In reality both McFarlane and Millar too the same idea and executed it differently, and yes, it’s hard to really judge a series after one issue but I can’t be arsed wading through cliches when to be honest, Mark’s Saviour of 25 years ago is still more interesting and it’s dated dreadfully.

If you really want to see the idea of a born again Christ in the modern age done well then I highly recommend Russell T. Davies’s The Second Coming that he wrote for ITV in 2003 and starred Christopher Eccleston. It’s a better, more entertaining, deeper, less cliched, dreary and obvious than this effort here from McFarlane.

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