What I though of ‘Whipping Up A Storm’ by Natalie Rowe

whippingupastorm

Natalie Rowe is a Bradford born dominatrix who had some very interesting clients in the 80’s onwards, and Whipping Up A Storm is her story from a wee girl in Bradford dreaming of fame and fortune, to a head of an escort agency called Black Beauties who would service the needs to the rich and powerful in London, and indeed, in other parts of Europe. In the UK she’s famous for causing a bit of a stir about her relationship with current Chancellor George Osborne, and this picture of her and Osborne at one of her parties in her flat in London.

OsbourneRoweCoke

The book tells Rowe’s story in more or less sequential order from her youth in Bradford through to her moving to London in the 80’s, then her success in building up her business selling sex to the rich and powerful and ends at some point in the 90’s where to say the very least, she’s lived a life and a half by then.

Throughout the book Rowe does make you confront your feelings about prostitution as it’s the case her that I never get the impression 99% of the time that Rowe is being exploited by anyone. She comes over far too strong a person for that, and the argument is that she and her agency provided a service which a variety of customers more than glad use, and it’s these customers that provide some of the humour of the book as frankly, some of them are powerful, but pathetic figures desperate to relive some of that domination they had in the places likes Eton where they grew up. I’ll not reveal too much but my personal favourite is Mr. Twist, and although his personal peccadillo made my eyes water Rowe makes one particular story of him leg-crossingly hilarious.

But the money shot of this book is George Osborne, the man it seems is destined by the Tory Party to succeed David Cameron as Conservative leader, and he hopes, the next UK Prime Minister. Even when she first meets Osborne as part of a group of three exceptionally posh, not to mention wealthy friends she’s wary of him, and although she indulge in a bit of S & M (on a professional level) with him (he likes dressing in rubber pants) she feels he’s not an especially nice, or indeed, a decent person.

Osborne frankly comes over badly as a spoiled, entitled rich kid that thinks he’s destined for big things but fails to relate to the working class of poor because as a good Tory, these are not Osborne’s people. He also comes over as a damaged person but almost psychopathic in his dealings with people which is something that even a casual observer can see. Then there’s the drugs and there’s a lot of drugs (he calls them ‘naughties’) consumed by Osborne in the course of this book.

If you like political gossip, biographies and a big chunk of social comment (which runs through this book whether Rowe meant to or not) then Whipping Up A Storm is an essential read. Yes there are problems with it. A good editor would have tightened up the narrative plus a proofreader would have cut out the spelling and grammar mistakes but this is a self-published book via Amazon so don’t expect that same level you get elsewhere in those regards.

Otherwise this is a cracking bit of gossipy, scurrilous muck-spreading that reminds the public that the  reader that those MP’s who proclaim to be morally superior are probably being buggered senseless, or being whipped by someone like Natalie Rowe who’ll charge them a rather large sum of money for it.

The book is available via Amazon and can be bought here. Do so, it’s worth a tenner just for the Osborne stuff by itself….

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