What I thought of Doomsday Clock

Geoff Johns and Gary Frank’s Watchmen sequel, Doomsday Clock, is the best example we’ll ever get of how much corporate comics treat creators as only money generating units even though that creator is firm that their work was never meant to be exploited as it has been with this 12-issue mess designed only to weld parts of the Watchmen story onto the main DC Universe.

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The problem lies in the fact that Geoff Johns has never actually read and understood Watchmen. Sure, he’s read it, but these 12 issues show he’s read it purely at a superficial level. All the stuff about the comics industry, creativity and humanity has been replaced by cold, hard cynicism and the need to drive forward with Big Event Comics to increase sales rather than do anything which advances the medium.

For Johns, Watchmen is just a story about a plot to kill superheroes and how that developed. It’s an entirely superficial reading of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons book. Johns fills each issue with typical superheroic violence but Watchmen violence is used sparingly, so when it is used the effect is shocking. Here, Johns and Frank just throw it around so it becomes meaningless which is exactly the opposite message Watchmen sends out.

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Here the message is ”how cool is it we’ve got Rorschach and Dr. Manhattan fighting Batman and Superman?” and that ultimately is the only premise behind the book. The plot, as it is, exists only to drive things towards a climactic meeting of Dr. Manhattan and Superman. In effect, Doomsday Clock is a device to revamp Superman in the image of Geoff Johns regardless of what current writer Brian Bendis thinks. Same goes with Batman, where here Alfred plays a crucial part in the story but in the series, he’s been murdered by Bane so he is very dead. Of course, superhero comic death isn’t real death but the fact is that Dr. Manhattan in this comic is analogous to Geoff Johns casually waving his hand and changing things as he wants.

The irony here is that Johns places the blame for ‘dark, grim and gritty’ comics at the feet of Alan Moore, but the reason those comics gained traction was because of people like Geoff Johns who neither had the talent to ape people like Moore, or the inclination to do something different so much of his work seems nostalgic but its nostalgia dipped in the grim cynicism of the dark and gritty phase of comics. In short, he’s trying to have his cake and eat it but trying to blame the disaster of things like The New 52 (DC’s short-lived attempt to gritty up all their line) on anyone but themselves.

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Ultimately all this was designed to do was to use Alan Moore’s name to give this project a legitimacy it never deserved as reducing a work which stands as one of the best mainstream comics ever made to just a product to exploit for new content to keep fans happy because they care more about Superman and Dr. Manhattan fight than the creative rights of Alan Moore or indeed, any other creator who have been shafted over the decades. These fans have all the stuff back. Multiple Earths are back, the Legion of Super-Heroes are back, the JSA are back and so is the New 52 because DC just can’t let go of failed ideas so they’ve dug up Grant Morrison’s old concept of Hypertime and rebranded it for a new generation.

So there it is. DC’s latest roll of the dice, even if it wiped its collective arse with the concept of creative rights and the kick is that the comic builds in future crossovers to prolong the Big Event Comic for the decade ahead and creator wishes be damned because there’s no solidarity among most fans or creators. As long as they get their toys to play with and the content to read they don’t care and that ultimately was all Doomsday Clock was. Content that does nothing for the medium of comics, and doesn’t even care if it does.

1 thought on “What I thought of Doomsday Clock

  1. Pingback: Why did Tom King shame Jae Lee? | My Little Underground

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