What I thought of Star Trek: Picard

There’s a point in one of the final episodes of Star Trek: Picard where I’m sitting there looking at a gigantic space battle where I have no idea what’s going on as the screen was just full of stuff. It looked fine but there was no real weight behind the battle but the producers of Picard thought it best through this scene to show how much money had been spent on the production. That for me summed the series up but I get ahead of myself.

I loved Star Trek: The Next Generation. It was (eventually) a smart, clever science fiction series that most of the time didn’t insult the viewer, plus it managed to present modern-day issues through the lens of Star Trek which is something it’s done since the very first episode which Gene Rodenberry made back in the 60’s. TNG was for many people, the defining SF series of their generation but the Next Generation crew had an awful send off with their last film, Nemesis, so the chance to have a great send-off for these characters, especially Picard, was one many of us grabbed with both hands.

The first trailers for Picard were great. They had maybe too much of an action focus but warning signs were there in the names of Akiva Goldsman and Alex Kurtzman.  Neither have an especially great record and neither seemed like they’d be involved with what many thought would be, a revival of TNG with that programme’s intellectual and moral core.

And for the first episode or two things were fine. There was a lovely, slow introspective pace that allowed Patrick Stewart to act his socks off as we were introduced to Picard 20 years after we’d last seen him trying to deal with his failures at the end of his life. The new characters were interesting, especially the Romulan couple working with Picard. Yes there was a little bit of action plus the Borg subplot seemed possibly distracting but on the whole, the first few episodes were great. But there were real issues. Starfleet seemed wrong. Less of a fleet of exploration but more military feeling while the paradise of the Federation was reduced to people holding racist beliefs. Now Star Trek has dealt with these things before, especially in the excellent Deep Space 9, but there was always a positive message that ultimately humanity could be better, even if there were one or two who fell from grace. Here so many humans have fell from grace with manufactured failures that it doesn’t feel that humanity has evolved into a better place.

The problems lie with heavily thrusting bad analogies for Brexit and Donald Trump into the programme which are then promptly dumped for a generic space adventure plot which ends up with Picard being surrounded by a bunch of unlikeable characters we don’t give a fuck about, plus Jeri Ryan’s Seven of Nine from Voyager who has had four years of a careful character arc wrecked to become a generic space adventurer and all that character work was just thrown aside.

The best episode outwith the first few is the Riker and Troi episode where again, things slow down, characters breathe, things develop but even then the producers inflict misery upon two characters for no reason than to add some ‘character development’. This is the problem, there’s no attempt to do anything but blunt development, which mixed with the urge to make the new characters ‘flawed’ leads to a mess. Then there’s the failure to develop Picard. Having a character like him confront his death in one last mission would have been interesting, but having him bleat like a lovelorn puppy to Data (who does actually get a good ending here) that he loves him. Then of course there’s giving Picard an android body so he can carry on, which the TNG Picard would have been horrified with but this isn’t the TNG Picard, this is the movie Picard.

It’s all a bit too forced. It’s all a bit too generic. It’s all too flashy. It doesn’t feel like Star Trek. It is missing a trick by falling on easy options rather than giving us a Star Trek unafraid to be intellectual, to be slow-paced and to force audiences to think. Instead it’s Generic Space Adventure with big dumb explosions and guns that go pewww.

I hope next season improves. With the delay in everything thanks to Covid19 there’s no excuses in having no time in developing the scripts but with Kurtzman at the helm again I’m not holding out much hope of an improvement.

 

1 thought on “What I thought of Star Trek: Picard

  1. Trek was Roddenberry. He had a vision that held everything together. It’s the vision that made a lot of us fans.
    Everything since he died has seemed like a cloying attempt to wring money out of what he left, to “find the right formula” because that’s how Hollywood seems to “think.”
    I hold out some small hope because most of the damage in Trek-land has been in a mirror universe. Maybe if Q gets involved and gives us Gene back he can show us how it’s alright back here. It would be the ultimate anti-shark-jumping.

    Liked by 1 person

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