The Old Grey Whistle Test revival was a remider as to why Punk needed to happen

Last Friday BBC Four broadcast a live Old Grey Whistle Test one-off revival show with Bob Harris presenting. Within five minutes I remembered why I hated the programme til it dropped endless sessions with Santana or Yes and started to bring on new Punk or early electronic music to give the programme a jolt of life because to be blunt, the show was mainly fucking tedious for much of it’s life, and when it did have something with a bit of balls it was sneered at.

When growing up the sound of Bob Harris used to fill me with dread because he may introduce Bowie or Marley (and lets not talk about how little the programme supported black artists) one minute.

We might even be luck and get a bit of Roxy Music weirdness.

But most of the time it was endless plains of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Emerson Lake and Palmer and endless Bob Harris whispering at you like that weird guy you’d later meet at Glastonbury in 1992 talking about that time he saw Lindisfarne in 1973.

Then at some point the BBC realised the programme needed dragged into the present, brought in Annie Nightingale and started giving more and more Punk and new bands a chance.

Most of all the programme on the whole stopped speaking down to kids like me who gave zero fucks about how long it took to record one guitar solo when I wanted to hear stuff that was exciting and felt alive. By the mid 80’s it was essential telly for things like this wonderful Jesus and Mary Chain performance

For a generation the show wasn’t tired old men talking earnestly about rock music but it returns with this version of the show that reminds me of being bored, annoyed and fed up wishing something exciting would happen but it’s time has past and it should remain locked in the cupboard.

So please don’t bring it back. The last thing we want to do is expose a new generation to Bob Harris talking about Dire Straits.





Superman Returns

Action Comics is due to hit its 1,000th issue in April. In it Superman finally ditches the armour he’s been wearing since The New 52 revamp and returns to his traditional outfit.

Superman after being away for so long is back, and Action #1000 also feature the wonderful José Luis García-López, an artist who I’ll be blogging about in more detail soon as one of the finest, but yet under-appreciated, artists of the last 40 years.

There’s a lot of people who hate Superman quoting anything from the character being boring or too good, or powerful, but yet this is the basis for the genre of super heroes and done right, Superman is a character than can show us the best of who we. He is also escapism and he can also be used to deal with issues of the day as he was 1,000 issues ago in Action Comics #1.

When Superman started it was dark times with an economic recession and the rise of the far right threatening us, and we’re in similar times so Superman can stand as a beacon of hope rather than the arsehole he was in The New 52, or the brooding killer of Zack Snyder’s imagination. Instead we’re hopefully back to having a heroic figure for people to aspire to which is what we need in a genre full of ‘edgy’ anti-heroes as sometimes you need to point to a moral standard to aspire to rather than just accept lazy cynicism passing for ‘cutting edge’.

We shall see but regardless, hitting 1,000 issues in an American comic (British comics use to pass that milestone regularly) is an achievement and if that includes the proper Superman returning then all the best for it.

Peter Wyngarde has passed away

For people of a certain age, Peter Wyngarde was the face of the school holidays where you’d be glued to the telly watching repeats of Jason King or Department S. He later of course cut a wonderful baddie in Flash Gordon as Klytus.

Wyngarde was one of those actors who ended up inspiring a whole load of people from Mike Myers for his Austin Powers character, to Chris Claremont and John Byrne for their X Men run with the ‘Jason Wyngarde’ character.

He was so popular at one point he released a solo album titled imaginatively enough, Peter Wyngarde. It has a track called Rape.

Moving on, he also did a fantastic version of Neville Thumbcatch which just sums up that point in the early 70’s where the hippy dream hasn’t fully died yet, but we’re also falling into a cultural mess that ends up in Punk in 1976.

So cheerio to one of those characters we’ll never, ever have again…

What I thought of Doctor Who: Twice Upon A Time

In terms of stakes this episode of Doctor Who had a lot to achieve. It wasn’t just the last episode of Peter Capaldi’s run, but also head producer Steven Moffat, as well as being the first introduction of the first female Doctor, Jodie Whittaker. Add into this the fact the story was a multi-Doctor story with David Bradley doing a good job of portraying William Hartnell’s first Doctor plus we’ve got a WW1 army officer played by Mark Gatiss who has been displaced in time for some reason. It sort of works as long as you’re prepared to ignore the plot as that’s really secondary to what else is going on here.

The episode starts with a recap of the very first regeneration 709 episodes ago as the First Doctor (One) faced down the Cybermen, and that nicely leads into One meeting Capaldi’s Doctor (Twelve) at the South Pole after he’s just faced down the Cybermen. Both are refusing to regenerate; in One’s case because he wants to die in the same body he was born in and in Twelve’s case because he’s done with it all. He’s tired of fighting and just wants some peace. In the middle of all this is the riddle of why a WW1 officer has be placed out of time with both Doctor’s? Enter a group of glass androids powered by memories called Testimony who harvest people’s memories at the moment of death, so when Twelve’s former companion Bill Potts returns she can only remember everything up the point of her death. Twelve suspects something bad is going on, and One and Twelve team up to find out what’s going on.

It turns out the plot doesn’t really matter. Testimony aren’t baddies, but actually an academic project from the future to preserve human memories and experiences. This plot device allows Moffat to bring back all of Twelve’s companions (yes, including Clara) to give Capaldi’s Doctor a farewell, and deals with the idea of memories never being replaced. We’ll just make new ones and move on instead of wallowing in past memories which is as subtle a way as possible as saying we need to move on but we’ll still have memories to fall back on when we can. to an audience partly made up of people concerned the new Doctor will be having adventures while not in possession of a penis.

As an episode it is probably the best Christmas special since A Christmas Carol, and a nice sendoff for Capaldi who again shows that he can make any script sing, and here’s been the problem with Moffat’s time as head writer; all the promise of his first year with Matt Smith vanished as plots became needlessly convoluted and were rarely resolved in any satisfying manner. Twice Upon A Time is a fairly simple story by Moffat standards but the hundreds of thousands watching for the regeneration who aren’t regular viewers would have been scratching their heads over some of the plot which did involve having a bit of knowledge of Moffat’s run and indeed, the 54 years history of the programme. Indeed one of the other problems of Moffat’s time is a viewer needed some knowledge of the history to appreciate the programme fully. That said the revelation of just who Mark Gatiss is playing is a lovely wee touch for fans of the programme going back to Patrick Troughton’s time, though I found Moffat making Hartnell’s Doctor a sexist prick

Yet this episode feels like a palate cleanser for what’s to come. A new producer/head writer in the shape of Chris Chibnall, and of course, a new Doctor in the form of Jodie Whittaker. Everything is set up at the end of this episode for a totally fresh start which brings me to the regeneration. Isn’t my favourite. That’s still Peter Davidson to Colin Baker at the end of Caves of Androzani. That story also featured a Doctor fighting off a regeneration, but in this case it was to save the life of his companion and it features the best opening lines from a new Doctor while breaking the fourth wall.. It still can’t be beat.

Capaldi’s regeneration is good though and is essentially a monologue outlining what the Doctor should be; never cruel or cowardly which is the line former Doctor Who writer Terrance Dicks has used for years to describe what the basic character of the Doctor. How Moffat uses that line here is to tell the audience that as long as the Doctor remains these things then they are the Doctor, regardless of how they look.

The new Doctor has a cliffhanger to resolve but she comes to the audience as either a blank slate, or as an evil example of how the snowflake Femnazis are making everything awful from the ”we’ve got blue passports” brigade. She’s got the potential to give the programme the jolt it needs as long as Chibnall remembers that not every viewer will be dripping in the history of the programme and to make stories accessible while at the same time keeping the hardcore fan happy. Not an easy task, but I wish them well and although I’m full of regret we never saw Capaldi hit his full potential that we’re going to get something very special with Jodie Whitaker.

Grasping the Thistle: A documentary about Partick Thistle…

Supporting a football team can be easy if you’re just jumping on a bandwagon and supporting a team because they’re successful. When you support a team like Glasgow’s Partick Thistle, success, is measured by different metrics than winning European trophies or billion pound sponsorship deals.

Back at the early days of this millennium, Partick Thistle were pushing hard to gain promotion to Scotland’s top flight. This BBC documentary is full of everything that makes supporting smaller teams painful, and wonderful, at the same time.


What I thought of Doctor Who:Shada

The Tom Baker era of Doctor Who is for many of a certain age, their era of Doctor Who, and it was always a tragedy that the last Douglas Adams story, Shada, was never completed due to a strike. Various attempts over the years have attempted to recreate it as best as possible with varying levels of success but the new 2017 recreation/completion mixed with original unbroadcast footage is as probably as close as we’ll get.

This would have been Adams final story for Who as at this point the Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy was just taking off and it really is built round Adams writing a love letter to his time at university in Cambridge. In fact much of the action takes place in a professor’s room not to mention that the action is on the whole, far more intellectual than modern Who’s more action/adventure style. This isn’t perfect, and the script has holes in it that you’d think would have been picked up had their not been the strike but the joy of watching Tom Baker in his pomp, aided by a glorious Lalla Ward (who I hope provides Jodie Whitaker with inspiration) in an adventure together most of us haven’t seen is simply wonderful, not to mention nostalgic.

As for the plot, it is something that adds greatly to Time Lord lore (Shada is the Time Lords prison planet) but on the whole the story suffers from being planned as a 6-parter. It gets a bit flabby in places, and a clever pun gets overused. There’s also the issue of poor monster henchmen and the aforementioned holes in the plot leaves holes at crucial points.When it does work it simply is a thing of genius. Baker and Ward are clearly loving the dialogue which is clever without being smug, or totally outwith of most people’s ability to understand. Adams is having fun here, and the scene where Baker’s Doctor convinces a ship’s computer that he’s actually dead is just pure Adams. There’s also a running joke where poor K9 is frequently treated with contempt which mirrors much of what the production team thought at the time.

Shada is an interesting experiment. The animation doesn’t quite work, but suspend your belief enough and it does the job in giving us an unfinished Douglas Adams work.The extras are a delight, and as for the new scene filmed with Baker? That’s a delight and nicely links forward/back to Doctor Who’s 50th anniversary special. Overall Shada is a joyful piece of nostalgia and a celebration of what made Tom Baker’s time as the Doctor so incredibly special.

What I thought of Crisis on Earth X

The superhero team-up is getting to be commonplace nowadays with both Marvel and DC films throwing heroes together with a variety of success, but it is to the world of television that we should look for what is by far the best example of how to do a superhero team-up and that is the four-part ‘Arrowverse‘ story, Crisis on Earth X.

One of the reasons the Justice League film failed was it pulled characters from the comics in a pretty generic ”bad guy looks to take over the Earth” storyline. Crisis on Earth X uses an old JLA storyline from 1982 written by Gerry Conway and Roy Thomas called Crisis on Earth Prime as the basic inspiration of the storyline which was given away from their marketing material a few months back. They also take a few things from Grant Morrison and Frank Quitley’s All-Star Superman

As well as elements of Alan Moore’s Superman stories, especially this…

Essentially they dip into the history of DC Comics, nick what they want, adapt it to the storyline and spit out something that works beyond what the limits of telly budgets should do. By using mainly second tier characters (thanks to the restrictions imposed upon them by the film arm of Warner Brothers) the producers have carved themselves a superhero universe unafraid of not just embracing the soap opera elements of serialised superhero comics, but the political aspects that often get buried in superhero comics.

The plot revolves round an alternative Earth where the Nais won WW2, and the Nazi counterparts of Green Arrow and Supergirl, along with Prometheus, Reverse Flash and Metallo along with hordes of disposable Nazi soldiers invade the Earth of our heroes not just to expand the Nazi empire but to steal Supergirl’s heart and place it into Overgirl’s (the Nazi Supergirl) body as she’s dying as she’s soaked up too much solar radiation. The stakes essentially are high so virtually every superhero (along with various sidekicks and partners) in the Arrowverse comes together to fight the Nazi menace. That is a lot of costumed characters!

It should fall apart. It is simply too big for a TV series to do but ambition, along with a nice script that gives everyone their little, or big moment and although there’s some heroes not included in this (Elongated Man, Martian Manhunter and the Arrowverse Superman) this somehow makes a gigantic cast work in 162 minutes of television, as well managing to propel all four series (Supergirl, The Flash, Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow) on in terms of characterisation and plot.

There are faults. There’s a bit too much crawling around in air-shafts in one episode, Supergirl is effectively written out the action for nearly two episodes, and some of the supporting cast vanish after episode one. In the final showdown the ambition overtakes the budget as the effects of an army of super-powered Nazis who happen to have a space/time ship on the civilian population falls down as they couldn’t get the masses of extras. However all the big actions set-pieces still outdo anything the Justice League film did, and matches much of what Marvel splash billions on.

But the positives outweigh the faults. Having Nazis as the baddies is more relevant in 2017 than it was in 1982, and this element of politics of having a diverse squad of heroes made up of of men, women, straight, LGBT, white, black, Muslim, Jewish, Hispanic, etc heroes beat Aryan white supremacists into the ground. In the era of Trump, Brexit and increasing white nationalism across the west it is nice to see Nazis being hit, and hit a lot. Crisis on Earth X works and to think it’s based off a 35 year old comic only people like me remembered makes it deliciously fun. I mean, the sight of The Flash and The Ray (a second tier DC superhero played by Russell Povey who pops up out of nowhere) fighting the Red Tornado will give old DC fanboys like me more fun than we’ve had in ages. Even seeing the Crisis logo is a nice buzz.

Does this wash away the taste of Justice League? yes. Does it give Marvel a few tips? Yes. Does it respect the comic source material and wallow in the fact? Yes. Is Crisis on Earth X perhaps the best example of a superhero team up outwith of the first Avengers film? Yes. This is a joy from the minute it starts to the end with its flaws being weak enough to ignore.and you can sit down and enjoy this as a wonderful letter to the superhero comics of the past as well as showing how to do superheroes in the present.